The GHID Blog

Welcome to our blog, here we go in depth with our design projects and hopefully we teach you a bit about interior design and our industry. If you're looking for a specific blog post, check out our archive here!

Detecting Your Interior Design Style: Mad for Mid-Century Modern

Identifying Your Design Style

Two years ago here on the GHID blog, we had a series called Detecting Your Interior Design Style. In it we covered Eclectic, Contemporary, Traditional, and Modern styles! Today we are reviving this old series with a brand new season of exciting episodes, the first of which will cover mid-century modern style!

What is the Definition of Mid-Century Modern Interior Design?

Mid-Century Modern is essentially just what it sounds like. It is a style that was first popular from roughly the 1940's to the 1970's, and came out of Word War II as designers opted for a more organic and simple style, full of curves and geometric shapes. The term was popularized in the 80's, with the release of Cara Greenberg's book Mid-Century Modern: Furniture of the 1950s. The term applies to furniture, architecture, and art. In architecture, Mid-Century Modern homes can be identified by a large amount of windows and an open floor plan, and almost are always found in post-war suburbs. These homes were designed to bring a modern touch to these suburbs, and met the needs of the average American family at the time.

Let's Get Familiar with Mid-Century Modern

Organic shapes and a desire to incorporate nature into interior design is a staple of Mid-Century Modern.

RIVINGTON_3
RIVINGTON_3

While natural, curvy shapes were incorporated, there was also an emphasis on geometric shapes. The key was to get the two to work together in harmony!

CHIC_INTERIOR_DES_PORT_5
CHIC_INTERIOR_DES_PORT_5

Walls of windows and fold-up furniture with multiple uses were both popular when this style first began, and can still be used very tastefully today!

WATERSIDE_LIVING_7
WATERSIDE_LIVING_7

Hopefully  this gave you a jumping-off point to do your own research. What style should we tackle next here on the blog? Let us know in the comments!