The GHID Blog

Welcome to our blog, here we go in depth with our design projects and hopefully we teach you a bit about interior design and our industry. If you're looking for a specific blog post, check out our archive here!

Top 5 Ways To Use Design To Organize Your Life:

With spring-cleaning just around the corner, senior interior designer Collin Kayser chimes into the blog with his tips on keeping homes organized. Most homeowners we work with want their projects to result in a beautiful and organized home. In a well designed home, everything has its place and each room has a function. Let’s see what Collin has to say on the matter.  

Bar items are stored above the wine refrigerator and sliding pocket doors keep them out of the way while entertaining. 

Bar items are stored above the wine refrigerator and sliding pocket doors keep them out of the way while entertaining. 

Form and function are always important when considering organization of one’s space. However, that doesn’t mean you need to sacrifice style. Consider your priorities and needs and focus on the area at hand. Small adjustments and tips and tricks from the trade can greatly improve organization within a space and the day-to-day functions we all experience.
— Collin Kayser, Senior Interior Designer

#1 Organizational Drawers and Built-in Features

Collin loves to add organizational drawer and cabinet inserts to the kitchen when the budget allows. “Drawer storage is the most accessible, so adding organizational features only adds to their function.“ 

In the "serving area," frequently used pantry items are stored in an easy pull-out cabinet and the day-to-day dishes and silverware drawers have added organizational features. 

In the "serving area," frequently used pantry items are stored in an easy pull-out cabinet and the day-to-day dishes and silverware drawers have added organizational features. 

#2 Give Careful Consideration to the Function

Consider where and how you will use an item. This will help dictate its placement and readiness when needed. Create zones in a kitchen space. Think about prep zones, serving zones, cleaning zones, cooking/baking zones, breakfast zones, etc. This will help with the organization and planning the placement of items. 

Closed storage can be a good option when it is clothing items or accessories you don't access daily. Having glass fronts makes sure you don't forget what's in there!

Closed storage can be a good option when it is clothing items or accessories you don't access daily. Having glass fronts makes sure you don't forget what's in there!

#3 Maximize Your Closet Spaces

You might not think of a designer being necessary for the closet, but GHID’s clients prioritize the closets in their Master Suites and plan them carefully.  Besides selecting pretty cabinets and hardware, our designers put a lot of thought into the layout of clothing and shoes, as well as how clients’ accessories are stored and accessible. Different types of storage maybe better suited for certain items and your designer will help you take all this into consideration. 

In this home, our designer placed a functioning and beautiful bookcase in the place of a typical attic storage door. The family's seasonal and occasionally used items can be stored back there and from the view of the home there is just a nice looking bookcase, but its also a hidden door.

In this home, our designer placed a functioning and beautiful bookcase in the place of a typical attic storage door. The family's seasonal and occasionally used items can be stored back there and from the view of the home there is just a nice looking bookcase, but its also a hidden door.

#4 The Golden Rule of Storage

A good rule of thumb for any storage space is: Keep the most accessible items within the standard reach range. Long term/occasional items can be stored up high or away from primary functions.

Here, Collin used pocket doors on “locker-style” cabinetry to keep them out of the way when they need to be open. He also utilized an open cabinet space and added electrical outlets for a family “charging station.”  

Here, Collin used pocket doors on “locker-style” cabinetry to keep them out of the way when they need to be open. He also utilized an open cabinet space and added electrical outlets for a family “charging station.”  

#5 Location, Location, Location! 

Work to organize spaces where clutter builds up, like the entryway. You and your family know that shoes, backpacks, homework, and mail all have a place in your home, but when everybody gets home at the end of a long day, they tend to drop everything they’re carrying in a pile by the front door. Instead of trying to change how your family functions, why not add organization to their routine? A more organized system can eliminate the hectic 5-minute scramble for schoolbooks, coats, and hats as your family is leaving for the day.